Empirical investigations into the perceptual and articulatory origins of cross-linguistic asymmetries in place assimilation

empirical investigations into the perceptual and articulatory origins of cross-linguistic asymmetries in place assimilation?

Empirical investigations into the perceptual and articulatory origins of cross-linguistic asymmetries in place assimilation
Author: Stephen James Winters
Publisher: Ohio University
Publication date: 2003
Number of pages: 371
Format / Quality: pdf
Size: 2,3 MB

One researchers have claimed that nasals are cross-linguistically more likely than stops to undergo place assimilaton because they have weaker perceptual cues to their place of articulation. This dissertation investigates this hypothesis by testing perceptual differences between speakers of English and Dutch, two languages which have different assimilatory patterns with respect to nasals and stops. The first perception experiment involves a magnitude estimation task, which requires Dutch and English listeners to make subjective estimates of the differences between nasals and stops of various places of articulation in VC syllables. The results of this study show that release burst cues significantly increase the estimated magnitudes of differences in stops over nasals, but that stops without these cues do not have a perceptual advantage over nasals.

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