Chief Stephen’s Parky. One year in the life of an Athapascan girl


Chief Stephen’s Parky. One year in the life of an Athapascan girl
Author: Ann Chandonnet
Publisher: Roberts Rinehart Publishers
Publication date: 1989
ISBN: 1879373394
Number of pages: 94
Format: PDF / ERIC – not so good
Size: 1,52 MB

Contents
Introduction
The Tanaina Months
Chapter One: Olga Plans a Parky
Chapter Two: Winter in Knik Village
Chapter Three: Muskrat Camp at Red Shirt Lake
Chapter Four: Ground Squirrel Camp
Chapter Five: Legend of the Twisted Snare
Chapter Six: Home Again
Chapter Seven: Summer Fish Camp
Chapter Eight: Berries and Beluga
Chapter Nine: Olga Finishes the New Parky
About the Characters and Places
Notes
Chief Stephen’s Parky
Back cover:
1898 in mainland Alaska was a time when white settlement was just beginning, and both Russians and Americans were blending their cultures and their dreams in this cold land. This is the story of an Alaskan native American girl, Olga, the wife of the chief of an Athapascan village. It is not the story of the chief himself, but of his wife’s hard work, which enables him to hunt, trap, and lead the village. Olga works for one full year with great courage and independence trapping ground squirrels, and gathering the materials needed to tan, dye, and sew the furs. With them, she makes her husband, Chief Stephen, the most beautiful, functional, and creative squirrel skin parka the village has ever been.
The contributions of women to the history of the Pacific Northwest have been overlooked because of an emphasis on male trappers, traders, explorers, miners, and loggers. But for northern native Americans, men could not survive the harsh climate if they did not have a support system of women creating, repairing, and maintaining their special clothing. Chief Stephen’s Parky provides a picture of the life of these native women, showing just how important is the family behind the chief.
The Council for Indian Education Series
The Council for Indian Education Series is a non-profit organization devoted to teacher training and to the publication of materials to aid in Indian education. All books are selected by an Indian editorial boards and are approved for use with Indian children. Proceeds are used for the publication of more books for Indian children. Roberts Rinehart Publishers copublishes select manuscripts to aid the Council for Indian Education in the distribution of these books to wider markets, to aid in their production, and to support the Council’s educational programs.
Acknowledgements
A book like Chief Stephen’s Parky could never have been written without the groundwork in Athapascan culture laid by ethnologists like Cornelius Osgood and Frederica deLaguna; by linguists like James Kari, James Fall, and Priscilla Kari; and by native informants like Shem Pete, Peter Kalifornsky, and the late Mike Alex. I owe a debt to them all, and to many others like them not named here. I am also grateful to archaeologists William and Karen Workman of the University of Alaska, Anchorage, for always answering any questions with unsparing courtesy. My husband also merits thanks for his patience with this project. And to the late poet-laureate Margaret Mielke, who suggested in 1976 that I interview Mike Alex.
Abstract:
This book tells the fictional story of Olga, the wife of Chief
Stephen, leader of a Tanaina Athapascan village on Cook Inlet,
northwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Olga works for one full year with
great courage and independence trapping ground squirrels and
gathering materials needed to tan, dye, and sew furs to make a parka
for her husband. She uses alder bark for dye, whale sinew for
thread, sealskin for trim, a tough piece of hide for a thimble, a
sharpened ground-squirrel leg bone for a needle, and an awl made
from moose antler with a handle of moose bone. With these materials,
she makes her husband, Chief Stephen, the most beautiful,
functional, and creative squirrel skin parka the village has ever
seen. The warm clothing Olga provides for the chief makes possible
his success as a hunter, trapper, and village leader. Like other
Athapascans, the Tanaina were hunter-gatherers and led a nomadic
life style. The book describes the migratory seasonal cycle typical
of the Tanaina in their year-round quest for food and natural
resources. They developed an extensive system of trails over which
they traveled, making use of various fish, fowl, and animals in
different habitats at appropriate seasons. The book also depicts the
tribe at a point in their history when modern technology and
European ways were beginning to change their traditional way of life
forever. This book contains photographs, illustrations, and a map.
(LP)

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Remarks: Photographs and illustrations may not reproduce well

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